The 10th ATCMA Congress Speakers

Wenchun Zhang

Wenchun Zhang, Professor, Doctor of Philosophy in Medicine, Doctoral Supervisor, a renowned traditional Chinese medicine practitioner in Jiangxi Province, and a mentor for the academic experience inheritance of the seventh batch of nationally renowned traditional Chinese medicine experts. Currently, he serves as the Director of the Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine at Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the Director of the Institute of Qigong Science, and concurrently holds the positions of Vice President of the World Medical Qigong Association, Director of the Qigong Medical Committee of the Chinese Medical Qigong Association, Deputy Director of the Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Branch of the China Association of Chinese Medicine, Deputy Director and Secretary-General of the Disease Committee of the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies, member of the National Technical Committee for Standardization of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and member of the Terahertz Wave Biophysics Branch of the Chinese Physical Society. He has long been committed to the theoretical and practical research of Qi theory, qigong, and traditional Chinese medicine. He teaches courses such as “Selected Readings from Internal Classics,” “Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine,” “Qigong Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine,” and “Internal Inspection based on Traditional Chinese Medicine.” In the past five years, he has edited or co-edited textbooks for the “14th Five-Year Plan” such as “Qigong Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine,” “Health Preservation and Rehabilitation of Traditional Chinese Medicine,” “Traditional Chinese Rehabilitation Skills,” “Internal Inspection of Traditional Chinese Medicine,” and “Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine.”

Topic: Qigong Exercise Based on the Tripartite View of Form, Qi, and Shen in Life

Content Summary: Chinese Medicine believes that human life is composed of three elements: body, Qi, and mind. “Body” refers to the morphological organization of the body; “Qi” refers to the non-substantial field-like substance that fills the body and its surroundings; “mind” refers to one’s spiritual consciousness. These three elements constitute the essential components of human life, and they are integrated and inseparable. Qigong exercise involves the cultivation and regulation of these three elements of human life, bringing them into a tripartite unity. Understanding qigong from the perspective of the tripartite view of body, Qi, and mind in life can better grasp the essence of qigong exercise and effectively guide its practice.

Sihua Gao

Sihua Gao is among the first group of Qihuang Scholars, a nationally renowned TCM physician, and a famous TCM doctor in Beijing. He holds a Ph.D. in medicine and serves as a doctoral supervisor. Gao is a chief expert and second-level professor at Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. He is a mentor for the academic experience inheritance of national veteran TCM experts and has served as the chief scientist for the TCM special project of the National 973 Program. He is a central leadership health consultation expert. Additionally, he has been recognized as the chief health science expert of the Chinese Medicine Association and an influential figure in TCM science popularization, as well as the “Glorious Doctor” and “Top Ten Medical Experts with Outstanding Contributions” in public evaluations.
Sihua Gao is among the first graduates to earn a master’s degree and a doctoral degree in TCM in China, having studied under renowned TCM experts Professor Zhang Zhenyu and Professor Fang Yaozhong. He has studied abroad in Japan and the UK. He has previously served as the director of the Graduate Department and vice president of the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences; the director of the Department of Science and Education and the Department of Science and Technology of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine; and the president of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine.
He has also held concurrent positions as vice president of the Chinese Medicine Association, the Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine, the China Health Care Association, the China Medicinal Cuisine Research Association, and the Chinese Society of Geriatric Health Medicine.
Currently, he is the president of the Chinese Medical Qigong Association; vice president of the Internal Medicine, Diabetes, and Music Therapy branches of the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies; chairman of the Chronic Disease Conditioning Committee of the China Medicinal Cuisine Research Association; chairman of the Women and Children’s Dietary Therapy Committee of the China Eugenics and Genetics Association; honorary chairman of the Endocrinology Committee of the Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine; and honorary chairman of the Diabetes Committee of the Chinese Medicine Association.
Sihua Gao has been passionate about martial arts since childhood and is a seventh-generation inheritor of Yang-style Tai Chi. He has been practicing Qigong for over 30 years and has deep insights into using Qigong for health maintenance and disease prevention.
He specializes in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of complex diseases such as diabetes, thyroid diseases, endocrine disorders, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and kidney diseases. He has been invited multiple times to provide medical consultations and lectures in Thailand, the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, Australia, Hong Kong, and other countries and regions. He has also been invited to provide medical care and health consultations for foreign dignitaries, including the Queen of Bahrain and the President of Kazakhstan.

Topic: Research on the Intervention of Baduanjin Qigong in Type 2 Diabetes

Objective: To investigate the clinical effects of Baduanjin Qigong on type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients.
Methods: This study enrolled T2D patients aged 40-75 years with poorly controlled blood glucose and high dysfunctional attitude scores. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups, receiving a 12-week intervention of Baduanjin Qigong or the eighth set of radio calisthenics, respectively. Blood levels of C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, leptin, adiponectin, free fatty acids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were measured before and after the intervention. Additionally, the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), and WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) were used to evaluate depressive symptoms, dysfunctional attitudes, negative automatic thoughts, and life quality, respectively. The differences between the two groups post-intervention, as well as the changes within each group before and after the intervention, were analyzed. Participants maintained their basic treatment regimens throughout the study.
Results: The 12-week intervention with Baduanjin Qigong significantly improved insulin sensitivity, reduced total cholesterol, and showed a trend toward lowering HbA1c levels in T2D patients. The intervention also ameliorated both general and specific depressive symptoms, enhanced quality of life, and positively influenced deep-seated negative cognitions related to depression. Moreover, Baduanjin Qigong significantly improved mental tranquility and satisfaction with social interactions, affecting deeper levels of negative cognition.
Conclusion: Regular practice of Baduanjin Qigong offers significant benefits for glucose metabolism and mental health in T2D patients, proving to be an effective exercise therapy for managing T2D.

Tianjun Liu

Tianjun Liu

Beijing University of Chinese Medicine professor, chief physician, doctoral supervisor

Honorary President of the Chinese Medical Qigong Society

Psychology supervisor, Chinese Psychological Society

Psychological supervisor, Chinese Mental Health Association

Topic:Talk about the ultimate goal of traditional Chinese qigong practice

Shixiang Hu

Shixiang Hu is a chief physician and master’s supervisor. He serves as the Dean of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Chinese Medicine and Director of the Emergency and Trauma Center.

He has been recognized as:

  • A distinguished TCM practitioner in the third session of Henan Province.
  • One of the fourth batch of excellent TCM clinical talents nationwide.
  • A leading figure in the field of TCM in Henan Province.
  • The head of the National Regional TCM (Specialty) Diagnosis and Treatment Center and the high-level TCM key discipline appointed by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
  • Vice Chairman of the Emergency and Critical Care Branch of the Chinese Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
  • Chairman of the Emergency Branch of the Henan Provincial Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
  • Vice Chairman of the Emergency Medicine Branch of the Henan Provincial Society of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine.
  • Vice Chairman of the Stroke Branch of the Henan Provincial Society of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine.
  • Chairman of the Emergency/Critical Care Medical Quality Control Center of TCM Healthcare Institutions in Henan Province.
  • Chairman of the Medical Record Quality Control Expert Committee of Secondary TCM Healthcare Institutions in Henan Province.
  • Vice President of the Emergency Branch of the China Association for the Promotion of Traditional Chinese Medicine Research.
  • Vice President of the Emergency Medicine Branch of the China Ethnic Medicine Association.

Hu Shixiang has made significant contributions to emergency medicine and critical care, particularly in the integration of traditional Chinese and Western medicine approaches.

Topic: Simple Traditional Chinese Medicine Approaches to Pain Management

Pain is one of the most common symptoms in clinical practice, affecting patients’ quality of life significantly. Common conditions include headaches, frozen shoulder, abdominal pain, and acute lumbar sprains. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) features various therapies that are effective in alleviating pain-related conditions, such as acupuncture, cupping therapy, tuina massage, and herbal external applications. This lecture will explain how to apply simple and accessible TCM therapies to treat pain.

Xianqing Ren

Xianqing Ren is a distinguished figure in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), particularly in pediatrics. Holding the titles of Third-Level Professor, Chief Physician, Doctoral Supervisor, and Postdoctoral Cooperative Supervisor, Ren serves as the Secretary of the Party Committee at the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Additionally, Ren holds the position of Secretary of the Party Committee at the Pediatric Medical College of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and serves as the Director of the Pediatric Regional Diagnosis and Treatment Center under the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Ren’s contributions to the field are vast and significant. He is a leading figure in high-level disciplines and holds several prestigious positions, including Vice Chairman of the Pediatric Professional Committee of the Chinese Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Executive Chairman of the Innovative Community of Childhood Purpura Nephritis Association, and Vice President of the Pediatric Branch of the Chinese Ethnic Medicine Association.

Under the tutelage of renowned TCM master Professor Ding Ying, Ren has dedicated over two decades to clinical, teaching, and research work in pediatric TCM. His primary research focus lies in the prevention and treatment of pediatric kidney and immune system diseases using TCM methodologies. Ren has accumulated rich clinical experience in treating conditions such as allergic purpura, purpura nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and enuresis.

Ren has led three National Natural Science Foundation projects and nine provincial and ministerial-level projects. He has authored or co-authored over 50 core papers, including four SCI-indexed papers, and has contributed to 16 academic monographs, serving as the chief editor for three and deputy editor for five. Ren’s contributions have been recognized with six scientific research achievement awards, including two second prizes of the Henan Science and Technology Progress Award, one third prize from the Chinese Ethnic Medicine Association, two first prizes of the Henan Provincial Department of Education Science and Technology Achievement Award, and one first prize of the Henan Province Traditional Chinese Medicine Science and Technology Achievement Award. Additionally, Ren holds four computer software copyright awards.

Topic: Traditional Chinese Medicine Treatment for Childhood Enuresis

Childhood enuresis is one of the common renal disorders in pediatrics. This lecture will provide an overview of childhood enuresis, including its etiology, risk factors, diagnostic classification, comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment strategies, preventive measures, and home care. By elucidating these aspects, we aim to enhance understanding of enuresis, establish a scientific approach to prevention and treatment, and promote the overall well-being of children.

In TCM, childhood enuresis is often attributed to kidney deficiency and imbalance in the body’s qi (vital energy) and yin-yang (the balance of opposing forces). Treatment strategies typically involve a combination of acupuncture, herbal medicine, dietary adjustments, and lifestyle modifications. Acupuncture can help regulate the function of the kidneys and bladder, while herbal formulas are prescribed based on individual patterns of disharmony identified through TCM diagnosis. Additionally, dietary recommendations may include foods that nourish kidney yin and qi, while avoiding those that exacerbate dampness or heat in the body.

Preventive measures and home care play crucial roles in managing childhood enuresis. Parents and caregivers can support children by establishing a regular bedtime routine, encouraging frequent bathroom breaks during the day, limiting fluid intake before bedtime, and creating a positive and supportive environment to reduce stress and anxiety.

By integrating TCM principles and practices into the treatment of childhood enuresis, we can address the root causes of the condition and promote holistic healing for children, fostering their physical and mental well-being.

Xiaodong Feng

Xiaodong Feng, second-level professor, chief physician, doctoral supervisor, Dean of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Chinese Medicine, Dean of the School of Rehabilitation Medicine of Henan University of Chinese Medicine, leader of key disciplines and specialties appointed by the National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, responsible person for the standardized construction of TCM rehabilitation service capabilities appointed by the National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, renowned TCM expert in the Central Plains region, leading clinical talent in TCM in Henan Province, director of the Rehabilitation Equipment Engineering Research Center of Henan Province, responsible person for the TCM rehabilitation training base in Henan Province, director of the TCM Rehabilitation Quality Control Center of Henan Province, director of the Rehabilitation Equipment Engineering Research Center of Henan Province, and director of the TCM Rehabilitation Key Laboratory of Henan Province. He also serves as a member of the Teaching Guidance Committee of Medical Technology Higher Education Institutions under the Ministry of Education, chairman of the Rehabilitation Branch of the Chinese Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vice secretary-general of the Chinese Society of Rehabilitation Medicine, chairman-elect of the Committee of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Integration of the Chinese Society of Rehabilitation Medicine, and president of the Henan Society of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Feng Xiaodong studied under Professor Sun Sulun from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and Grand Master Zhang Lei. With nearly twenty years of experience in clinical practice, teaching, and research in the field of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine rehabilitation, his research focuses on stroke-related hemiplegia, aphasia, dysphagia, cognitive impairment, treatment of shoulder subluxation, motor dysfunction after spinal cord injury, bladder dysfunction treatment, cognitive impairment, sensory disorders, motor disorders after traumatic brain injury, as well as internal medicine conditions such as insomnia, cough, and autonomic nervous system disorders.

He has led 3 National Natural Science Foundation projects, 5 provincial and ministerial-level projects, and participated in 4 national key R&D projects. He has published over 130 core papers at home and abroad as the corresponding/first author, including 17 SCI papers. He has edited 6 national planned textbooks and has received 7 provincial-level scientific research achievement awards, including one first prize from the Chinese Society of Rehabilitation Medicine for Science and Technology, one second prize from Henan Provincial Science and Technology Progress Award, one first prize and one second prize from Henan Provincial Teaching Achievement Award, and 12 first prizes from department-level scientific and technological progress awards. He has been granted 4 invention patents and over 30 utility model patents.

Topic: Traditional Chinese Medicine Rehabilitation Treatment for Stroke

Stroke is a common and frequently occurring disease characterized by a high mortality and disability rate, posing a serious threat to people’s health. This lecture will elaborate on the overview of stroke, common functional impairments associated with stroke, and the role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) rehabilitation in treating these impairments.

Stroke often leads to various functional impairments, such as hemiplegia, aphasia, dysphagia, cognitive impairment, and motor dysfunction. TCM rehabilitation plays a significant role in alleviating these impairments and improving the quality of life for stroke patients.

TCM rehabilitation approaches for stroke typically involve a combination of acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage therapy, dietary adjustments, and lifestyle modifications. Acupuncture can help regulate the flow of Qi and blood, promote neural regeneration, and improve motor function and sensation in affected limbs. Herbal medicine formulations are tailored to individual patterns of disharmony identified through TCM diagnosis, aiming to nourish Qi and blood, invigorate the collaterals, and enhance recovery. Massage therapy techniques, such as Tui Na (Chinese therapeutic massage) and acupuncture point stimulation, can promote circulation, relieve muscle stiffness, and improve range of motion. Dietary recommendations may include foods that nourish the spleen and stomach, which are believed to be closely related to post-stroke recovery in TCM theory. Lifestyle modifications may involve gentle exercise, stress management techniques, and adequate rest to support the body’s healing process.

By integrating TCM rehabilitation into the treatment of stroke, we can effectively address the functional impairments commonly seen after stroke, enhance neurological recovery, and ultimately improve the overall survival and quality of life for stroke patients.